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HB 129 "CHOOSE ACT" INFORMATION

Cross River Academy WILL NOT be participating in the "Choose Act" at this time.  This legislation in Alabama is one which will be very helpful to many families, however, with legislation such as this, so comes many rules and regulations that may or may not inhibit a families ability to homeschool without government oversight.  While the premise of the program is noble, and helpful to many, it opens the door to many regulations that can effect your homeschooling in the future.
 

AT THIS TIME, HB 129 REQUIRES THE FOLLOWING OF ANY SCHOOL THAT WISHES TO PARTICIPATE AND RECIEVE FUNDS FOR TUITION, FEES, ETC.

 

Participating Schools

A school must choose to participate to receive money from a child’s ESA.

In order to participate and receive funding, a school must:

  • Be accredited by or in the process of being accredited by an approved accrediting agency named in the bill,

  • Agree to comply with the Alabama Child Protection Act, meaning adults must go through background checks,

  • Provide financial statements to the Alabama Department of Revenue that show their ability to provide educational services to the student, or provide a surety bond,

  • Require students to take a standardized test that meets the requirements, unless the student has a disability that exempts them from being tested,

  • Provide school-level test scores to the Department of Revenue,

  • Tell the Department of Revenue if the student withdraws or misuses the ESA

As of July, 2014, homeschool is recognized in Alabama

as a viable option for families. 

Homeschool Diplomas are now to be recognized by state colleges just as they would a Public School Diploma!

The State Superintendent has stated (not publicly) that he does not feel that a family needs to register with a Cover School.  This is the families choice.  With that being said, there are still many benefits that come with registration.  One, and in my mind the most important, is that you have a legal covering.  Until the law on the books in Alabama states that you do not need a cover school, it is practical to be wise and register with one.  The law on the books still reads as shown above.

 

Several counties in Alabama now offer online learning wherein the student schools at home via a program set up by the school district.  These students are still required to attend school a minimal amount of days in order to participate in this type of education option. 

 

CHILDREN WHO SCHOOL AT HOME, THROUGH A PUBLIC SCHOOL OPTION, ARE NOT CONSIDERED HOME SCHOOLED. 

Those children are still registered in a public school program and will not need a cover school

Legal Scales.jpg

Cross River Academy DOES NOT offer legal advice.

ALABAMA'S COMPULSORY SCHOOL AGE:

 

Compulsory Attendance Age Lowered on May 8, 2012 from 7 to 6, effective August 1, 2012.

This law changes the compulsory attendance age from 7 to 6, however; a parent of a 6 year old may opt out of enrolling the child until age 7 by notifying the Board of Education in the County of residence, in writing, that the child will not be enrolled until age 7.

 

Compulsory school age in Alabama is age 6 through age 17. 

Alabama Home Schooling Laws

per HSLDA

In Alabama, there are three options under which you can legally homeschool. Note that church schools and private schools can establish their own policies for teacher qualification, days of instruction, and required school subjects.

 

Option 1: Homeschooling with a church school:
A church school offers instruction in grades K–12 or any combination thereof, including preschool, through onsite or home programs, and is operated as a ministry of a local church, group of churches, denomination, and/or association of churches that does not receive any state or federal funding. A home may be the location where a child receives instruction as a student attending a church school. A parent may establish a church school in the home, or the home may be an extension of an existing church school.

Option 2: Homeschooling with a private school:
A private school is established, conducted, and supported by a nongovernmental entity or agency offering educational instruction in grades K–12 or any combination thereof, including preschool, through onsite or home programs. A home may be the location where a child receives instruction as a student attending a private school. A parent may establish a private school in the home, or the home may be an extension of an existing private school.

Option 3: Homeschooling using a private tutor:

1. Select a private tutor with the required qualifications. 

2. Ensure that your child is instructed in the required subjects and for the required number of days. 

3. The private tutor must comply with reporting and record-keeping requirements. 

Several counties in Alabama now offer online learning wherein the student schools at home via a program set up by the school district.  These students are still required to attend school a minimal amount of days in order to participate in this type of education option. 

 

CHILDREN WHO SCHOOL AT HOME, THROUGH A PUBLIC SCHOOL OPTION, ARE NOT CONSIDERED HOME SCHOOLED. 

Those children are still registered in a public school program and

will not need a cover school

HSLDA.jpg
For more information on legalities of homeschooling, contact the Homeschool Legal Defense Association.
Click the picture above.
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